Friday, August 17, 2018

7 reasons why turning over this government to a military junta is not a good idea



Pres. Rodrigo Duterte, presidential photo
A netizen who is formerly supportive of the current administration enumerates 7 reasons why, for him, Pres. Rodrigo Duterte's recent statement akin to turning over our government to a military junta is not a good idea.

In his Facebook post, Bryan Ng Co, who now seem to be critical of the president's leadership, elaborated the factors that make it unsuitable for the country to be lead by a junta.

What is a junta? It is defined as a 'military or political group that rules a country after taking power by force'.

On the said social media post, Co argued that it will do more harm than good should Pres. Duterte decide to actualize his previous junta remark.

One of the reasons, as cited by the former, is that it would 'beef up' the likes of NPA, the BIFF, the MNLF.

This country has, for decades, multiple insurgency groups. Installing a junta government will more than likely beef up the ranks of the NPA, the BIFF, the MNLF, etc.

In addition, the incumbent chief executive, according to the netizen, is 'dreaming' if this is his way of getting rid of the Liberal Party members. This is because it will, in the event military junta pushes through, only bolster the ties of LP members and thus make them 'more united against this military dictatorship'.

What is Duterte's objective in turning his government over to a junta? If it is to rid the country of the LP members, he is dreaming. What he'll end up doing is galvanize the dwindling LP members and make them more united against this military dictatorship. If, however, his plan is to use the junta to dismantle the oligarchic stranglehold on the RP economy, he need not employ the military. Just open the country up to foreign competitors. Level the playing field through legislation.

Co, who's known to be vocal in his stand on politics on Facebook, added that this would not work in case this is Pres. Duterte's attempt to prevent a Robredo-led Philippines as it is mandated by the constitution.

If this junta idea is to prevent Robredo's constitutional succession, he can simply stay on until 2022. It's that simple. If, however, he truly wants to resign, then he has to allow a Robredo accession to the presidency. He cannot have the cake and eat it, too.

The netizen continued with his contradiction and even compared such idea to martial law.

Lastly, a junta rules NOT with reason and democratically-drafted laws but with the barrel of a g*n. The Philippines has had its experiment with long-term martial law under Marcos. While the jury is still out on his legacy, the nearly 2,000 desaparecidos certainly left a lot of crying and angry families demanding answers. Marcos' rule was martial law under a civilian government. A military junta is a military government. I loathe to think how much more restrictive a military government can be compared to Marcos' martial rule.
Pres. Ferdinand Marcos, photo from Rogue
Even before, the 73-year old president already mentioned the possibility of switching to a military government. However, last June, he made it clear that martial law would never work in the country, and that it is not part of the 'radical change' that he was planning to do in the country. 

Read Bryan Ng Co's complete Facebook below:

Why Duterte Turning Over This Government to a Military Junta is Not a Good Idea

1. This country has, for decades, multiple insurgency groups. Installing a junta government will more than likely beef up the ranks of the NPA, the BIFF, the MNLF, etc.

2. We have recently passed the Bangsamoro Organic Law. A junta will render to naught the progress made in this area.

3. RP does not have much in the way of exports. We have a consumption-led, service-dominant economy. A junta may not necessarily restrict imports but it will surely put to question the viability of all the BPO companies that have set up shops here.

4. In the off chance that this junta that Duterte has in mind is patterned after Thailand's, then maybe, it won't seriously curtail our human rights. In the event that it isn't and it turns sour, can we really stomach being summarily rounded up by the ruling military elite?

5. What is Duterte's objective in turning his government over to a junta? If it is to rid the country of the LP members, he is dreaming. What he'll end up doing is galvanize the dwindling LP members and make them more united against this military dictatorship. If, however, his plan is to use the junta to dismantle the oligarchic stranglehold on the RP economy, he need not employ the military. Just open the country up to foreign competitors. Level the playing field through legislation.

6. If this junta idea is to prevent Robredo's constitutional succession, he can simply stay on until 2022. It's that simple. If, however, he truly wants to resign, then he has to allow a Robredo accession to the presidency. He cannot have the cake and eat it, too.

7. Lastly, a junta rules NOT with reason and democratically-drafted laws but with the barrel of a g*n. The Philippines has had its experiment with long-term martial law under Marcos. While the jury is still out on his legacy, the nearly 2,000 desaparecidos certainly left a lot of crying and angry families demanding answers. Marcos' rule was martial law under a civilian government. A military junta is a military government. I loathe to think how much more restrictive a military government can be compared to Marcos' martial rule.

Can you begin to imagine the kind of adjustments we'd all have to make given this kind of drastic change?
Bryan Ng Co, photo from Fcebook
Source: Bryan Ng Co

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